Category Archives: Design

Ten Anonymous Design Icons

design icons, everyday designMany daily things that we use has been developing through years and centuries, but we usually take for granted all those things without even thinking about where did some particular product cam from.

There are multitude design products have evolved anonymously through a process of “natural selection” that is driven by practical need rather than by aesthetic concern. Such objects are in most cases superlatively functional, as their performance has been honed by successive generations of designers, craftsmen and manufacturers.

This article will cover most known and prosperous everyday design icons that have stayed as anonymous designs.

1. PAPER CLIP

paper clip evolutionImage Sources: www.fastcompany.com, http://en.wikipedia.org

The first bent-wire paper clip was patented in the United States by Samuel B. Fay in 1867. It was designed for attaching tickets to fabric, and in the process of exploration, it was discovered that the paper clip could be used to attach papers together.

Although it was admitted as a functional and practical design, Samuel Fay’s design along with the 50 other designs patented prior to 1899 are not considered as ancestors of the modern paperclip design known today.

There have been many paper clip designs made. You can take a look at them here.

The paper clip we use today is called Gem paper clip that has never been patented.

But it was most likely designed in Britain according to according to the American expert on technological innovations, Professor Henry J. Petroski.

2. CLOTHE PEG

clothe pegImage Sources: www.diverseherts.org.uk, www.manufactum.com, www.faffree.co.uk

Shaped wooden pegs that were made from a single piece of wood were invented by a celebate Quakers group named Shakers in 18. century.  This group left persecution in England in 1774 and settled in Albany, New York.

The first clothes peg was patented in March 1832, it was described as a bent strip of hickory held together with a wooden screw.

The wooden screw proved to be totally impractical because rain or even dampness would cause the screw to swell, rendering the pin inoperable.

Only 21 years later David M. Smith of Springfield invented “a spring-clamp for clotheslines” in 1853. It was made of two wooden “legs” hinged together by a metal spring. Smith’s clothe peg is the forebare of everything we have on our washing lines today.

Take a look at really amazing clothe peg evolution collection here.

3. WINE CORK

wine corkImage Sources: http://venetiancat.com, www.thinkgreenliveclean.com

Cork as a stopper was used by the Egyptians thousands of years ago. Ancient Greeks also used cork oak bark to make stoppers for vessels for wine and olive oil.

In the 1600s, a French monk called Dom Pérignon started to use cork as a wine bottle closure and from that time cork is still used as a wine stopper in our days.

Traditionally, containers that were holding sparkling wine had been plugged by wooden stoppers wrapped in olive oil-soaked hemp. But a monk Dom Pérignon observed that these stoppers often popped out. He successfully swapped the conical plugs for cork stoppers and cork soon became essential for wine bottling.

4. WINE BOTTLE

wine bottle history, glass bottleImage Sources: www.winescellarsnmore.com, www.wineintro.com, http://antiquehelper.rfcsystems.com, www.anoseforwine.com

Wine has been known in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. Winemakers saved their wares in clay flasks – amphorae. The Romans developed glass blowing and glass bottles were a perfect containers for storing wines because glass didn’t affect wine and it was easy to see what kind of wine is in it due to it’s transparency. At that time, each glass bottle was hand made and this created a huge variety of bottle sizes.

In around 1800s the industry had developed ways of creating standard sized bottles and regions adopted for their wines ideal bottle size.

Only in 1979 the US set a requirement that all bottles must be exactly 750ml.

Around the same time the European Union also requested winemakers to choose one size bottle for every region. The 750ml size has become adopted by many countries and the main reason was to ship wines to the US with ease.

To read precise information about wine bottle history, click here.

5. ZIP FASTENER

zipper history, zipper designImage Sources: http://fabricwarehouse.com, www.thefullwiki.org

Elias Howe, inventor of a sewing machine, received a patent in the year 1851 for an ‘Automatic, Continuous Clothing Closure.’, but E. Howe didn’t pursue marketing his clothing closure and as a result,Howe missed his chance to become the recognized ‘Father of the Zip.’

Forty-four years later, Mr. Whitcomb Judson marketed a ‘Clasp Locker’ a device similar to the one that Howe patented. Clasp Locker’ was a complicated hook-and-eye shoe fastener. It was put out in the market, but his 1893 patent did not use the word zipper.

Swedish engineer Otto Frederick  Gideon Sundback of Hoboken took off on the earlier prototypes and created the “Separable Fastener,” that was patented in 1917.

It took twenty more years to convince the fashion industry to seriously promote the novel closure on garments. The bog boom of the zipper came when it could open on both ends.

6. PADLOCK

vintage padlocks, padlock historyImage Sources: www.romanlocks.com, www.historicallocks.com,

Earliest locks come from the Roman Era, 500 BC–300 AD. They were known in early times by merchants traveling the ancient trade routes to Asia and China.  The basic technological concept of the first door locks – a bolt that can slide in both directions through the use of a key.

The padlocks used today has evolved from a design that was created in England – dated 850 AD. It was made from wrought iron sheet using simple lever and ward mechanisms.

The earliest padlocks used in the US, called smokehouse locks, were made of a wrought iron sheet and employed simple lever and ward mechanisms. Around the middle of the 19th century, “Scandinavian” style locks were brought to America and became a more secure alternative to the prevailing smokehouse and screw locks.

In the early 1920s, Harry Soref founded Master Lock company and produced off a first laminated padlock. The entire stack of plates, loaded with the lock parts in it, was riveted together. This padlock was popular for its low cost and an impact-resistant laminated plate design.  Nowadays many lock makers still copy this successful design.

  • To see different types and shapes of padlocks click here.
  • More information about history and types of padlocks click here.
  • If you are interested to find out broad history of roman padlocks, click here.

7. TWEEZERS

ancient tweererz, vintage tweezersImage Sources: www.prm.ox.ac.uk, http://gallery.nen.gov.uk, http://finds.org.uk, www.folica.com

Cave paintings show that early man discovered ways to remove hair from his face that are still being used today. Using two seashells put together, they plucked the hair out.

Tweezers are known to have been used in Ancient Egypt. There are drawings of Egyptian craftsmen holding hot pots over ovens with a double-bow shaped tool. Also, tweezers were used in beauty – people removed hair using tweezers. Asiatic tweezers, that were made of two strips of metal brazed together, were used in Mesopotamia and India from about 3000 B.C.

Roman shipbuilders pulled nails out of ship construction with plier-type pincers. Roman women used tweezers to pluck their eyebrows and remove hair from different parts of body.

From the very beginning tweezers were meant to be used for beauty and their main function hasn’t changed in our days.

8. WOOD SCREW

wood screwImage Sources: http://wapedia.mobiwww.nuts-bolts-manufacturers.com

Screw shaped tools became common around the first century. Early screws were made from wood and were used in wine presses, olive oil presses, and for pressing clothes.
Metal screws were used in 15th century Europe and wood screws were produced in a small cottage industry by the 18th century. Metal screws and nuts used to fasten two objects together.
In 1770, English instrument maker, Jesse Ramsden invented the first satisfactory screw-cutting lathe.

Wood screws didn’t undergo any major transformations until the very mid-19th century when machines were used to finish the head of screws. This took away the hand finished appearance of the bolt.

In 1908, square-drive screws were invented by Canadian P. L. Robertson. The Robertson screw is considered the “first recess-drive type fastener practical for production usage.”

Twenty-eight years before Henry Phillips patented his Phillips head screws, that are also square-drive screws.

Job and William Wyatt held the first patent for the industrial manufacturing of screws. Their patent outlined the process for creating screws with the help of a lathe and metal cutting tools.

George Nettlefield produced the first pointed screws in England and with the new changes to the tip it initiated the use of the screw for widespread joinery.

9. BELT BUCKLE

belt buckleImage Sources: http://finds.org.uk, http://gallery.nen.gov.uk, www.rodeobelts.co.uk

Belts and buckles have been used for clothing since the Bronze Age. Both women and men used them off and on, depending on the current fashion. Although, it was not common in female fashion except in the early Middle Ages.

During the 2nd and 3rd century B.C. the Chinese semi nomadic people known as the Xiongnu wore belt buckles over long Tunics. This kind of belt buckles were highly decorated and were worn as a mark of status. Germanic invaders, imported animal motifs characteristic of Scythian-Sarmatian decorative arts for their belt and buckles. This decorative art often represented animals entwined in mortal combat.

Several 7th-century gold buckles with interlacing curvilinear patterns and cutaway tongues were found in the Sutton Hoo ship burial.

British sailors invented the very first belt buckle, and soon it became all the rage. Sailors attached them to leather belts and found them useful for holding up water-logged clothes, as well as easy to remove even with shivering fingers.

In the 1920s men started wearing buckles and belts everyday, as trouser waists fell to a lower, natural line. Till 1920s, belts served mostly for a decorative purpose, and were associated with the military.

10. BETTY TEAPOT

betty teapot, teapot, english teapotImage Sources: www.etsy.comhttp://manuallaborpottery.blogspot.comwww.rareteacompany.com

The original teapots came from a red clay that was discovered in the Stoke-on-Trent area of Britain, in 1695. It was unusual clay that seemed to retain heat better. That’s why it found use as the material for the teapot as early as the seventeenth century.

Early pots were tall and shaped more like coffee pots. The glaze on the teapot is based on a brown glaze developed by the Marquis of Rockingham on his estate in England in the late 1700s. This Rockingham Brown glaze and the Betty shape was eventually shortened to the affectionate term Brown Betty which we use today.

In the nineteenth century the pots began to take on the more rounded shape of the modern Brown Betty.

The Rockingham Glaze was brushed on the pot and allowed to run down the sides, creating a streaky finish as it was fired.

In the Victorian era, when tea drinking was special, tea was brewed in the Brown Betty because it was considered excellent. This was attributed to the design of the pot which allowed the tea leaves more freedom to swirl around as the water was poured into the pot, releasing more flavour with less bitterness.

50 Art Nouveau Chair Collection

jugendstil furniture, art nouveau chairs, art nouveau furnitureArt Nouveau is an international movement and style of art, architecture and applied art – especially the decorative arts – that peaked in popularity at the turn of the 20th century (1890–1905). The name “Art Nouveau” is French for “new art”. It is also known as Jugendstil, German for “youth style”, named after the magazine Jugend, which promoted it, and in Italy, Stile Liberty from the department store in London, Liberty & Co., which made this style well known.

This movement is mostly known by Alphonse Mucha beautiful women posters and Antoni Gaudi unusual architecture.

The original elements of Art Nouveau furniture design are the line and curves. Most beloved bird was a peacock. Earlier Jugendstil furniture designs were already shown as conceptions of lines, of curves illuminating the constructive logic of objects. Furniture often was simple, but with some interesting details. Furniture designers made furniture for specific spaces in homes.

At that time most of the architectures were also designers. They created not only the exterior of a house, but also interior from curtains till furniture and lights. This article is a collection of fifty Jugendstil chairs from different designers. By bringing all their works together, you can get a well-defined understanding about Art Nouveau style.

1. Villa Esche Armchair by Henry Van de Velde

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2. Mahogany Desk Chair

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3. Chair by Eugene Gaillard

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4. Otto Wagner Armchair

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5. Fledermaus Chair by Josef Hoffmann

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6.  Chair designed by Peter Behrens

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7. Bloemenwerf Armchair by Henry Van de Velde

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8. Side Chair by Edouard Colonna

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9. Dinner Chair by Richard Riemerschmid

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10. Armchair by Henry Van de Velde

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11. Chair by Louis Majorelle

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12. Chair by Hector Guimard for a Concert Hall

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13. Armchair by Henry Van de Velde

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14. Armchair by Bernhard Pankok

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15. Armchair by Otto Eckmann

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16. Silex Chair by Gustave Serrurier Bovy

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17. Armchair by Edouard Colonna

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18. Chair by Henry Van de Velde

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19. Chair by Georges Hoentschel

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20. Dining Chair by Charles Rennie Mackintosh

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21. Cubus Armchair by Josef Hoffmann

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22. Chair by Louis Majorelle

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23. Armchair by Charles Francis Annesley Voysey

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24. Dining Chair

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25. Armchair by Joseph Maria Olbrich

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26. Chair by Hector Guimard Fauteuil

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27. Armchair by Louis Majorelle

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28. Siebenkugelstuhl Chair by Josef Hoffmann

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29. Chair by Arthur Heygate Mackmurdo

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30. Ombelle Chaise by Emile Galle

jugendstil furniture, art nouveau chairs, art nouveau furnitureImage Source

31. Mackmurdo’s Chair by Arthur Heygate Mackmurdo

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32. Chair by Gustave Serrurier Bovy

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33. Rocking Chair No 4

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34. Armchair by A.H.Mackmurdo

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35. Lounge Chair by Louis Majorelle

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36. BehrensStuhl

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37. Chair by Hector Guimard

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38. Dining Chair

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39. Armchair by Hector Guimard

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40. Diplomats Chair by Henry Van de Velde

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41. Chair by Richard Riemerschmid

jugendstil furniture, art nouveau chairs, art nouveau furnitureImage Source

42. Side Chair by Hector Guimard

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43. Chair by Georges de Feure

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44. Sitzmaschine Sessel by Josef Hoffmann

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45. Chair by Bernhard Pankok

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46. Chair by Charles Francis Annesley Voysey

jugendstil furniture, art nouveau chairs, art nouveau furnitureImage Source

47. Chair by Hector Guimard

jugendstil furniture, art nouveau chairs, art nouveau furnitureImage Source

48. Wien-Postsparkasse Stool by Otto Wagner

jugendstil furniture, art nouveau chairs, art nouveau furnitureImage Source

50. High Backed Chair by Charles Rennie Mackintosh

jugendstil furniture, art nouveau chairs, art nouveau furnitureImage Source

Design icons of the 20th century. Pt 3.

design icons, design collection, designers, This is a third part of the collection “Design icons of the 20th century”. I am sure that there were a lot of talented designers in the 20th century but those, who are mentioned in this collection, must be known to everyone who is related to design.

The third part of the collection will introduce you with one of the founding fathers of American modernism – George Nelson, a master of the fluid, futuristic style of the 1960s design – Verner Panton, Danish furniture designer Poul Kjaerholm, American architect and furniture designer Florence Knoll Bassett, Italian sculptor and furniture designer – Harry Bertoia.

designer, george nelson, portraitGEORGE NELSON

George Nelson (1908-1986) was, together with Charles & Ray Eames, one of the founding fathers of American modernism. We like to think of George Nelson as “The Creator of Beautiful and Practical Things”. His designs, which are still popular today, epitomize the perfect balance between form and function.

“What is the crowning glory of your civilization… the symbol as clear a statement as the pyramids, the Parthenon, the cathedrals? What is this symbol? What is its name? Its name is Junk. Junk is the rusty, lovely, brilliant symbol of the dying years of your time. Junk is your ultimate landscape.”

George Nelson

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, george nelson, clocksImage sources: www.express-furniture.co.ukhttp://moderndna.comwww.moderndesigninterior.com,

www.allmodern.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, george nelsonImage sources: www.ohthemodernity.comwww.dwr.comwww.1stdibs.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, george nelson, chairsImage sources: www.dwr.comwww.vitra.comhttp://bedzine.comwww.vitraonline.net

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, george nelsonImage sources: www.furniturestoreblog.comhttp://blog.iso50.comwww.gizmodiva.com

More information about G.N.

Verner Panton, designer, design icon, product designerVERNER PANTON

Verner Panton (1926-1998) was a master of the fluid, futuristic style of 1960s design which introduced the Pop aesthetic to furniture and interiors. Born in Denmark, he made his name there before settling in Switzerland in the 1960s.

With his visionary, colorful home furnishings, Panton sought ways to fashion a stylistically uniform, imaginative interior.  He created his  own unique design universe, where his uncompromising exploration of form, color and light resulted in a number of timeless products.

Panton experimented and used untraditional materials like plastics, fibre glass, perspex, steel, foam rubber and other synthetic materials, taking advantage of  the new technologies of the post-war era.

“A less successful experiment is preferable to a beautiful platitude.”

Verner Panton

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, verner panton, panton chairImage Sources: www.geniusjones.comwww.bonluxat.comwww.vitra.comwww.seatingtrends.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, verner panton Image Sources: www.treadwaygallery.comwww.bonluxat.comwww.bonluxat.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, verner panton Image Sources: www.1stdibs.comwww.dailyicon.netwww.stylepark.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, verner panton, lightingImage Sources: www.bonluxat.comwww.furniturestoreblog.comwww.bonluxat.com,

www.furniturestoreblog.com

designers, 20th century, industrial design, design, icons, verner panton, interiorsImage Sources: www.dexigner.comwww.rugdesignblog.com

More information about V.P.

poul kjaerholm portrait, designer

POUL KJAERHOLM

Poul Kjærholm (1929-1980) designed modern functionalist furniture that was praised for its understated elegance and clean lines. He was one of the foremost representatives of Scandinavian furniture tradition – but he belonged to the whole world because he refused to settle for Nordic self-sufficiency.

Although he was formally trained as a cabinetmaker, Kjærholm was a strong proponent for industrial production, and his work stands out among that of his Danish contemporaries because of his extensive use of steel frames rather than the traditional wood. He combined wood, tubes and leather in combination with steel in his furniture designs.

“I am trying to express the very language of the materials themselves.”

Poul Kjærholm

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, poul kjaerholmImage Sources: http://stores.advancedinteriordesigns.comwww.archiexpo.comwww.dcdr.dk

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, poul kjaerholmImage Sources: www.room100.nlhttp://detail.en.china.cnwww.dailyicon.net

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, poul kjaerholmImage Sources: www.jetsetmodern.comwww.styleinvestors.comwww.1stdibs.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, poul kjaerholmImage Sources: www.treadwaygallery.com, www.danishfurnituredesign.comwww.chairblog.eu

More information about P.K.

florence knollFLORENCE KNOLL BASSETT

Florence Knoll Bassett (1917-) is an American architect and furniture designer who studied under Mies van der Rohe and Eliel Saarinen.

As a pioneer of the Knoll Planning Unit, she revolutionized interior space planning. Her belief in “total design” – embracing architecture, manufacturing, interior design, textiles, graphics, advertising and presentation – and her application of design principles in solving space problems were radical departures from the standard practice in the 1950s, but were quickly adopted and remain widely used today.

Her approach of embracing everything about a space – architecture, interior design, graphics, textiles and manufacturing – was not the standard mid-century practice in space planning, but it caught on and continues to be the standard today. Shu was also a furniture designer, as well as a great eye for talent.

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, florence knoll bassettImage Sources: http://blog.vastudc.comwww.bonluxat.comwww.dwr.co

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, florence knoll bassettImage Sources: http://blog.vastudc.comhttp://acn.liveauctioneers.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, florence knoll bassettImage Sources: www.decorativeartstrust.orghttp://acn.liveauctioneers.comwww.dwr.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, florence knoll bassett, interiorImage Sources: www.decorativeartstrust.orgwww.burningsettlerscabin.com

More information about F.K.B.

Harry Bertoia portrait, designersHARRY BERTOIA

Harry Bertoia (1915-1978) was an Italian-born artist and modern furniture designer.

Modern classic Bertoia chairs rekindle the old world charm of elegance and quiet sophistication. These Italian modern classic designs combine style with comfort, the epitome of Bertoia designs!

Besides Bertoia Chairs, Bertoia is also known for creating over 50 sculptures which are on public display in towns throughout Unites States!

All of his work bears the hallmarks of a highly skilled and imaginative sculptor, as well as an inventive designer, deeply engaged with the relationship between form and space.

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, Harry BertoiaImage Sources: www.steeldomus.comwww.nova68.com, www.classic-design24.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, Harry BertoiaImage Sources: www.squidoo.comwww.designboom.comwww.kaboodle.com

designers, 20th century, furniture, industrial design, design, icons, Harry Bertoia, sculpturesImage Sources: www.homedosh.comhttp://en.wikipedia.org, www.galere.netwww.colecciondop.com

More information about H.B.


Design icons of the 20th century. Pt 2.

design icons, designers, architecturs, eams, corbusier, jacobsen, brauerThe second part of this collection is here! It has been a week since I had posted the first part and I hope that you had time to check it out.

In this part I will introduce you with architect and designer Charles Le Corbusier, Finnish architect and designer Alvar Aalto, meet Arne Jacobsen who is the father of iconic chairs such as “The Egg”, “The Swan”, “The Ant.”, furniture designer Marcel Breuer and famous designer couple Charles & Ray Eames.

Hope you will enjoy this part as much as the previous one!

Le Corbusier, design icons, designers of the 20th century, architectLE CORBUSIER

Real name was Charles-Edouard Jeanneret (1887 – 1965), was one of the greatest architects in the early 1900′s.
Le Corbusier is famous for his contributions to what now is called Modern Architecture. Le Corbusier was a pioneer in the theoretical studies of modern design and was dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowed cities.

Le Corbusier’s theories were enthusiastically read in the Bauhaus design school in Germany. However, Le Corbusier himself argued that Gropius and the Bauhaus pay too little attention to architecture and standardization.

Le Corbusier, furniture, arhitecture, design, product design, conceptImage source: www.thehirebusiness.com

Le Corbusier, furniture, arhitecture, design, product design, conceptImage sources: purecontemporary.blogs.comwww.express-furniture.co.ukwww.thehirebusiness.com

Le Corbusier, furniture, arhitecture, design, product design, conceptImage sources: www.skyscrapercity.comhttp://contemporarypractice.wordpress.com/, www.cartage.org.lb

More biography information about L.C.

Alvar Aalto, furniture, arhitecture, design, product design, conceptALVAR AALTO

Alvar Aalto (1898 – 1976) is one of the greatest names in modern architecture and design.

Alvar Aalto generated a style of functionalism which avoided romantic excess and neoclassical monotony. Although Aalto borrowed from the International Style, he utilized texture, color, and structure in creative new ways. He refined the generic examples of modern architecture that existed in most of Europe and recreated them into a new Finnish architecture. Aalto’s designs were particularly significant because of their response to site, material and form.

I beg you do not forget playfulness. – Alvar Aalto

Alvar Aalto, furniture, arhitecture, design, product design, concept, vasesImage sources: www.channel4.comhttp://blog.finnishgifts.com

Alvar Aalto, furniture, arhitecture, design, product design, conceptImage sources: www.furniturestoreblog.comwww.inhabitat.comhttp://3rings.designerpages.com

Alvar Aalto, furniture, arhitecture, design, product design, conceptImage sources: www.bonluxat.comwww.bonluxat.comwww.bonluxat.com

Alvar Aalto, arhitecture, design, conceptImage sources: www.architecture.rmit.edu.auhttp://architecture.about.comhttp://wikimedia.org

More biography information about A.A.

Arne Jacobsen, furniture designer, design icon

ARNE JACOBSEN

Arne Jacobsen (1902-1971) was one of Denmark’s most influential 20th century architects and designers. Both his buildings and products, like his Swan and Egg Chairs, combine modernist ideals with a Nordic love of naturalism.

Throughout his career Jacobsen maintained a high level of productivity.

“The fundamental factor is proportion,” Arne Jacobsen concluded. “Proportion is precisely what makes the old Greek temples beautiful…And when we look at some of the most admired buildings of the Renaissance or the Baroque, we notice that they are all well-proportioned. That is the essential thing.”

ARNE JACOBSEN, furniture, design, product design, concept, chairsImage sources: www.furniturestoreblog.comwww.homedug.com

ARNE JACOBSEN, furniture, design, product design, concept, chairsImage sources: decoracaodeaaz.blogspot.comvistadoobservador.blogspot.com,

growabrain.typepad.comwww.dolcn.com

ARNE JACOBSEN, furniture, design, product design, concept, egg chairImage sources: http://the-egg-chair.com/http://hivemodern.com

ARNE JACOBSEN, furniture, design, product design, concept,tables, Image sources: famousfurniture.euwww.kaboodle.comwww.bofb-shop.comwww.architonic.com

More biography information about A. J.

Marcel Breuer, furniture, design, product design, conceptMARCEL BREUER

Thanks to the innovative aluminium, tubular steel and plywood pieces he designed first at the Bauhaus in 1920s Germany and then as an émigré in 1930s Switzerland and England, Marcel Breuer (1902-1981) is best known as one of the early 20th century’s most influential furniture designers.

Breuer helped to develop modular or unit construction. This is the combination of standardised units to form a technically simple but functional complete unit.

Marcel Breuer, furniture, design, product design, conceptImage sources: www.classic-design24.comwww.bonluxat.comwww.bonluxat.com

Marcel Breuer, furniture, design, product design, concept, chairsImage sources: www.inter-classics.comwww.steeldomus.comwww.bonluxat.com

Marcel Breuer, furniture, design, product design, concept, chairsImage sources: www.bonluxat.comwww.vam.ac.ukwww.moderndesigninterior.comwww.bonluxat.com

Marcel Breuer, furniture, design, product design, concept, architectureImage source: www.aaa.si.edu

More biography information about M. B.

designers, charles eames, ray eamesCHARLES & RAY EAMES

Not only did Charles Eames (1907-1978) and his wife, Ray (1912-1988) design some of the most important examples of 20th century furniture, they also applied their talents to devising ingenious children’s toys, puzzles, films, exhibitions and such iconic mid-20th century Los Angeles buildings as the Eames House and Entenza House in Pacific Palisades.

Charles and Ray achieved their monumental success by approaching each project the same way: Does it interest and intrigue us? Can we make it better? Will we have “serious fun” doing it?

“The details are not details,” said Charles. “They make the product.”

charles and ray eames, furniture, design, product design, conceptImage sources: www.williammalcolmcollection.comwww.bonluxat.comwww.dsgnwrld.comwww.aram.co.uk

charles and ray eames, furniture, design, product design, conceptImage sources: www.hardware-wholesale.comwww.kaboodle.comcharles and ray eames, furniture, design, product design, conceptImage sources: www.officedesigns.comwww.bonluxat.comwww.bonluxat.com

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Design icons of the 20th century. Pt 1.

design icons, designers,architecturs, gray, rohe, wrightThis is the first part of a collection called “Design icons of the 20th century that you must know!” The main point is to pay attention to designers in the past that have inspired many designers in the present. I won’t re-write their biographies. You can find plenty of information on the internet. Let pictures be an inspiration for you!

In the first part I would like you to introduce with design icons such as Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Frank Lloyd Wright, Joseph Hoffman, Eileen Gray and Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe.


Charles Rennie Mackintosh, portrait, designerCHARLES RENNIE MACKINTOSH

Combining a progressive modernity with the spirit of romanticism, the Scottish architect and designer Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868 – 1928) created many of the best loved and most influential buildings, furniture and decorative schemes of the early 20th century.Mackintosh worked in interior design, furniture, textiles and, metalwork.

Excelling in all these areas, Mackintosh left hundreds of designs and a rich volume of realised work. His distinctive style mixed together elements of the Scottish vernacular and the English Arts and Crafts tradition with the organic forms of Art Nouveau and a drive to be modern. As his work matured Mackintosh employed bolder geometric forms in place of organic-inspired symbolic decoration.

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, furniture, chairs, wood, deisgnerImage sources: www.designicons.co.ukwww.michaelnassar.netwww.bonluxat.comwww.freud.eu

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, furniture, chairs, wood, designerImage sources: www.victorianweb.orgwww.victorianweb.orghttp://bc150.ecuad.ca

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, furniture, chairs, wood, designerImage sources: www.theglasgowstory.comhttp://collections.vam.ac.uk

Charles Rennie Mackintosh, interior, designerImage sources: www.architecture.comwww.rampantscotland.com

More biography information about C.R.M.

Frank Lloyd Wright, portrait, architectFRANK LLOYD WRIGHT

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) was one of the most prolific and influential architects of the 20th century. From his early Prairie Style homes, to the sculptural curves of the Guggenheim Museum in New York he defined a North American style of architecture which was rich in emotion and sensitive to its surroundings.

One of the founders of modern architecture in North America, Frank Lloyd Wright embraced the use of new technology, materials and engineering to create some of the 20th century’s most influential and iconic buildings. During a long and productive career spanning 70 years he designed over 1,000 buildings of which over 400 were built.

Frank Lloyd Wright, architecture, house, fallingwaterImage sources: http://elisavaprofessionals.comwww.gibson-design.com

Frank Lloyd Wright, architecture, houseImage sources: http://blog.antiquetrader.comwww.wallpaper.com

Frank Lloyd Wright, architecture, houseImage sources: www.santamonicapropertyblog.comwww.tommcmahon.net

Frank Lloyd Wright, architecture, house, chairs, furnitureImage sources: www.bonluxat.comhttp://forums.pelicanparts.comwww.bonluxat.com

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joseph hoffmann, portrait, designerJOSEPH HOFFMAN
Josef Hoffman (1870-1956) was Austrian architect, interior designer and applied artist.

Hoffman’s works combined functionality and simplicity of craft production with refined and innovative ornamental details and geometric elements.

He is an important precursor of the Modern Movement and Art Deco.

The strict grid pattern which formed the basis to many of his designs, as well as being a favoured decorative motif, earned him the nickname ‘Quadrutl H Hoffmann’ (Little Square Hoffmann).

design icons, joseph hoffman, chairs, designImage sources: www.deconet.comwww.allmodern.com

design icons, joseph hoffman, chairs, design, cubus sofaImage sources: www.retrotogo.comwww.hofmobiliendepot.at

design icons, joseph hoffman, chairs, design, nesting tableImage sources: www.ritabucheit.comwww.antique-marks.com

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eileen gray, portrait, designersEILEEN GRAY

Eileen Gray (1878-1976) is now regarded as one of the most important furniture designers and architects of the early 20th century and the most influential woman in those fields. Her work inspired both modernism and Art Deco.

Her design style was as distinctive as her way of working, and Gray developed an opulent, luxuriant take on the geometric forms and industrially produced materials used by the International Style designers, such as Le Corbusier, Charlotte Perriand and Mies Van Der Rohe, who shared many of her ideals.

Her voluptuous leather and tubular steel Bibendum Chair and clinically chic E-1027 glass and tubular steel table are now as familiar as icons of the International Style as Le Corbusier and Perriand’s classic Grand Confort club chairs.

eileen gray, design, furniture, tableImage sources: http://hodfurniture.comhttp://shop.livingspace.com

eileen gray, design, furniture, table, lightingImage sources: www.bonluxat.comwww.bonluxat.comwww.insignfurniture.com

eileen gray, design, apartmentsImage sources: http://designmuseum.orghttp://community.livejournal.com

eileen gray, design, furniture, aparmtent, interior, house e 1027Image sources: http://community.livejournal.com, http://rebeccalouisesmith-arch1201.blogspot.com

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Ludwig Mies van der rohe, designer, portraitLUDWIG MIES VAN DER ROHE

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886 – 1969) was German-American architect, who along with Walter Gropius and Le Corbusier, is widely regarded as one of the pioneering masters of Modern architecture. Mies, like many of his post World War I contemporaries, sought to establish a new architectural style that could represent modern times just as Classical and Gothic did for their own eras. He created an influential 20th century architectural style, stated with extreme clarity and simplicity.

Famous for his dictum ‘Less is More’, Mies attempted to create contemplative, neutral spaces through an architecture based on material honesty and structural integrity.

udwig-Mies-van-der-Rohe, interiorsImage sources: www.channel4.comhttp://blog.gabrielross.com

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, furniture, design, chairsImage sources: www.steeldomus.comhttp://furniture.architecture.skwww.bonluxat.com

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, architecture, houseImage sources: www.freewebs.comwww.artnet.com

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, tables, chaiImage sources: www.steeldomus.com, www.chairblog.eu, www.aram.co.uk

More biography information about L. M van der R.

Introduction

Hello everyone and welcome to my blog site www.sketchmyworld.com. Have you ever wondered about why other people are so great in sketching or drawing? I have and I have always been curious how they do it and how they came up with these skills.

We all have heard other people saying that practice makes perfect. But I have never witnessed the process how someone has improved his skills in, for example, sketching. That is why I have came up with idea making a blog where I am going to post at least one product sketch every single day. And I would like YOU to be my witness to see me improving my sketching abilities and become an awesome product design sketcher. And, of course, if you are willing to improve your own sketching skills with me, you are so welcome!

And now I would like to introduce myself just a little bit because you may find more information above in section “About me” – I am 20 year old student named Carin that has just graduated an art and design college. I am very interested in design, especially lighting and furniture.

The idea of writing my own blog was in my mind nearly a year. And one time I came up with idea creating a blog where I would post my sketches everyday. That way I would stimulate myself sketching everyday and share my sketches with other people.

I have made a short list of the main topics that I will write about:

1. Articles about everything that related to sketching – materials, tools, books, tutorials and other;

2. One article a week about different materials that are used in product designing. This will be also a wonderful self – education thing for me;

3. Articles about design icons, inspirational designers;

4. Articles about inspirations, how to keep going and stay positive and other.

So I hope you are interested enough to stay with me and start this wonderful journey! Make sure to check this blog everyday and have fun!

If you have questions, advises, ideas, you are welcome to write them in comments!

See you out there!